The marvellous spatuletail is a hummingbird with only four tail feathers; in males, two of these end in large blue “spatules”. The visibility of males, and the supposed aphrodisiac properties of their hearts, make them a target for slingshots. Adult males are outnumbered 5 to 1 by females and immature males. Endemic to a small area of Peru, this bird is considered endangered.

Photos (top to bottom): Marvelous spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis) by David Cook, Marvelous spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis) - World’s Rarest Hummingbird? by David Cook


The water deer is native to China and Korea, and it has been introduced to the UK and France. As in musk deer, males of the species have elongated canine teeth. These can be over 2 inches (5 cm) in length, and have resulted in water deer being known colloquially as vampire deer.
Photos, top to bottom: Chinese Water Deer by William Warby, Chinese Water buck by Don Sutherland

The water deer is native to China and Korea, and it has been introduced to the UK and France. As in musk deer, males of the species have elongated canine teeth. These can be over 2 inches (5 cm) in length, and have resulted in water deer being known colloquially as vampire deer.

Photos, top to bottom: Chinese Water Deer by William Warby, Chinese Water buck by Don Sutherland

cool-critters:

Araripe manakin (Antilophia bokermanni)

The Araripe manakin is a critically endangered bird from the family of manakins. As typical of most manakins, males and females have a strong sexual dimorphism in the colors of the plumage. The strikingly patterned males have a predominantly white plumage with black wings and tail. From the frontal tuft, over the crown, down to the middle back runs a carmine red patch. The iris is red. The females are mainly olive green. This species is endemic to the Chapada do Araripe (Araripe uplands) in the Brazilian state of Ceará in the north eastern region of the country. In 2000 there was an estimated population of less than 50 individuals and it was considered as one of the rarest birds in Brazil and in the world.

photo credits: wiki, wiki, abcbirds

The tamaraw, or Mindoro dwarf buffalo, is a critically endangered bovid endemic to the Philippines. Tamaraws differ from Asiatic water buffalos in that they are smaller and have straight, V-shaped horns. An estimated 300 tamaraws are believed to still exist in the wild.
Photo: Bubalus mindorensis by Gregg Yan 01 by Gregg Yan

The tamaraw, or Mindoro dwarf buffalo, is a critically endangered bovid endemic to the Philippines. Tamaraws differ from Asiatic water buffalos in that they are smaller and have straight, V-shaped horns. An estimated 300 tamaraws are believed to still exist in the wild.

Photo: Bubalus mindorensis by Gregg Yan 01 by Gregg Yan

Trumpeter swans are the largest waterfowl in North America.  Adults are white with black bills and black feet. While populations have increased since the early 1900s, some US states and Canadian provinces listed the swans as threatened into the 21st century.
Photo: Trumpeter Swans by T.O.Birder

Trumpeter swans are the largest waterfowl in North America.  Adults are white with black bills and black feet. While populations have increased since the early 1900s, some US states and Canadian provinces listed the swans as threatened into the 21st century.

Photo: Trumpeter Swans by T.O.Birder

The southern elephant seal is the largest seal and the largest member of the order Carnivora. Its name comes from both its size and the trunk-like proboscis seen on adult males. This proboscis can be used to reabsorb moisture from exhalations, allowing the seals to conserve moisture while spending the mating season on land.
Recent declines in the numbers of southern elephant seals have been observed, but the cause remains unknown. 

Photo: Southern Elephant Seal by Vince Smith

The southern elephant seal is the largest seal and the largest member of the order Carnivora. Its name comes from both its size and the trunk-like proboscis seen on adult males. This proboscis can be used to reabsorb moisture from exhalations, allowing the seals to conserve moisture while spending the mating season on land.

Recent declines in the numbers of southern elephant seals have been observed, but the cause remains unknown. 

Photo: Southern Elephant Seal by Vince Smith

The cotton-top tamarin is a critically endangered New World monkey found in a small area of northwestern Colombia. With an average weight under 1 lb (0.5 kg), it is one of the smallest primates and about the size of a squirrel.
Photo: Cotton-Top Tamarin by Louise

The cotton-top tamarin is a critically endangered New World monkey found in a small area of northwestern Colombia. With an average weight under 1 lb (0.5 kg), it is one of the smallest primates and about the size of a squirrel.

Photo: Cotton-Top Tamarin by Louise

The dugong is a large, herbivorous mammal found in coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific. The main component of the dugong’s diet is sea grass, which it uproots, shakes clean of sand, and eats whole, including the roots.
Photo: Dugong in sea grass meadow, Marsa Abu Dabbab by Ruth Hartnup

The dugong is a large, herbivorous mammal found in coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific. The main component of the dugong’s diet is sea grass, which it uproots, shakes clean of sand, and eats whole, including the roots.

Photo: Dugong in sea grass meadow, Marsa Abu Dabbab by Ruth Hartnup

Wilson’s bird-of-paradise is endemic to Indonesia. Males are vividly colored and have curled tail feathers. The species is considered near-threatened by IUCN.
Photo: Wilson’s Bird of Paradise by Doug Janson

Wilson’s bird-of-paradise is endemic to Indonesia. Males are vividly colored and have curled tail feathers. The species is considered near-threatened by IUCN.

Photo: Wilson’s Bird of Paradise by Doug Janson

The Greenland shark is a large, slow-moving shark found in the North Atlantic Ocean. Based on a study of a shark’s growth rate, it is hypothesized that Greenland sharks could live to be over 200 years old. This would make them one of the longest-living vertebrates on Earth.
Photo: expl9984 by NOAA Photo Library

The Greenland shark is a large, slow-moving shark found in the North Atlantic Ocean. Based on a study of a shark’s growth rate, it is hypothesized that Greenland sharks could live to be over 200 years old. This would make them one of the longest-living vertebrates on Earth.

Photo: expl9984 by NOAA Photo Library