bookrat:

lemurphant:

Peafowl can exhibit several kinds of color mutations, including leucism. Unlike albinos, leucistic animals lack most of the color pigments of their non-leucistic counterparts. In the peafowl, this means white feathers but blue eyes. Such mutations are rare in the wild but can be produced using selective breeding.
Photo: Peacocks by icmcwaffle

Close, but no. If this one has blue eyes than he’s a properly albino peacock.
Albino animals may have blue OR red eyes, it almost totally depends on the species. In cats and humans a lack of pigment in the eyes virtually always causes blue eyes due to the way they refract light. Red eyes are caused by you seeing the underlying red tissue and blood under the eye. If circumstances and the ambient light are just perfect you can even get colorless or purple eyes.
The confusion probably stems from the fact that the most common leucistic animal that the general public is familiar with is a white tiger, which as a cat obviously has the blue eyes rather than red like a mouse, fish, or snake.
Leucism in peacocks usually refers to the pied mutation(although there are other forms of partial albinism selectively bred into them too!). If this peacock has black eyes than it is technically leucistic after all, but that’s still a sub-type of albinism.

Thanks for the explanation. I am not a biologist/zoologist by any means and I appreciate any corrections!
Can you (or anyone) explain the last sentence (how leucism is a sub-type of albinism)?  My understanding is that they are separate conditions with different causes.

bookrat:

lemurphant:

Peafowl can exhibit several kinds of color mutations, including leucism. Unlike albinos, leucistic animals lack most of the color pigments of their non-leucistic counterparts. In the peafowl, this means white feathers but blue eyes. Such mutations are rare in the wild but can be produced using selective breeding.

Photo: Peacocks by icmcwaffle

Close, but no. If this one has blue eyes than he’s a properly albino peacock.

Albino animals may have blue OR red eyes, it almost totally depends on the species. In cats and humans a lack of pigment in the eyes virtually always causes blue eyes due to the way they refract light. Red eyes are caused by you seeing the underlying red tissue and blood under the eye. If circumstances and the ambient light are just perfect you can even get colorless or purple eyes.

The confusion probably stems from the fact that the most common leucistic animal that the general public is familiar with is a white tiger, which as a cat obviously has the blue eyes rather than red like a mouse, fish, or snake.

Leucism in peacocks usually refers to the pied mutation(although there are other forms of partial albinism selectively bred into them too!). If this peacock has black eyes than it is technically leucistic after all, but that’s still a sub-type of albinism.

Thanks for the explanation. I am not a biologist/zoologist by any means and I appreciate any corrections!

Can you (or anyone) explain the last sentence (how leucism is a sub-type of albinism)?  My understanding is that they are separate conditions with different causes.

Reaching lengths of up to 40 feet (12 m), the basking shark is one of the largest species of fish. Like whale sharks and megamouth sharks, basking sharks are filter feeders and survive mostly on plankton. While they can be found feeding close to the surface, they are not aggressive and are harmless to humans.
Photo: the lady and the shark by candiche

Reaching lengths of up to 40 feet (12 m), the basking shark is one of the largest species of fish. Like whale sharks and megamouth sharks, basking sharks are filter feeders and survive mostly on plankton. While they can be found feeding close to the surface, they are not aggressive and are harmless to humans.

Photo: the lady and the shark by candiche

astronomy-to-zoology:

Red-ruffed Lemur (Varecia rubra)

…an endangered species of lemur (Lemuridae) which, like all lemurs, is native to the island of Madagascar, where it is restricted to the rainforests of Masoala Peninsula. Red-ruffed lemurs usually live in small groups (sometimes larger groups are seen) which are lead by females. Like other lemurs, red-ruffed lemurs are mainly frugivores (fruit eaters) and typically seen foraging high in the canopies of trees. 

Currently red-ruffed lemurs are listed as endangered as they face threats from habitat loss due to their need for tall primary forests. Hunting remains a threat to their survival as well. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Primates-Lemuridae-Varecia-V. rubra

Images: Hans Hillewaert and RadioFan

The Atlantic puffin is a seabird found in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The colors of a puffin’s beak are brightest during mating season, and fade in the winter. 
Atlantic puffins spend most of the year alone at sea, returning to land to breed. Newborn puffins leave the breeding colony at about six weeks and head out to sea, not returning for 2-3 years. 

Photo: Puffins by Global Ranger

The Atlantic puffin is a seabird found in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The colors of a puffin’s beak are brightest during mating season, and fade in the winter. 

Atlantic puffins spend most of the year alone at sea, returning to land to breed. Newborn puffins leave the breeding colony at about six weeks and head out to sea, not returning for 2-3 years. 

Photo: Puffins by Global Ranger

Geoffroy’s tamarin is a small monkey native to Panama and Colombia. These animals are mostly arboreal and subsist primarily on insects and fruits. 
Photo: Geoffroy’s Tamarin (Saguinas geoffroyi) by Brian Gratwicke

Geoffroy’s tamarin is a small monkey native to Panama and Colombia. These animals are mostly arboreal and subsist primarily on insects and fruits. 

Photo: Geoffroy’s Tamarin (Saguinas geoffroyi) by Brian Gratwicke

The tiger quoll, or spotted-tail quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial native to eastern Australia. Tiger quolls are mostly nocturnal, emerging at night to hunt. They climb trees in search of prey or to escape predators, and will screech in warning at potential attackers.
Photo: tiger quoll by Pierre Pouliquin

The tiger quoll, or spotted-tail quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial native to eastern Australia. Tiger quolls are mostly nocturnal, emerging at night to hunt. They climb trees in search of prey or to escape predators, and will screech in warning at potential attackers.

Photo: tiger quoll by Pierre Pouliquin

The common hippopotamus is one of the largest land animals on Earth. Hippos spend most of their time wallowing in shallow freshwater rivers and lakes, emerging at night to graze.
Hippos’ skin can be up to 6 inches (15 cm) thick and provides protection in fights with other hippos and predators. They have very little body hair, and produce a reddish secretion that dries on the skin and protects them from sunburn and water loss.
Photo: Hippo by Thomas Hawk

The common hippopotamus is one of the largest land animals on Earth. Hippos spend most of their time wallowing in shallow freshwater rivers and lakes, emerging at night to graze.

Hippos’ skin can be up to 6 inches (15 cm) thick and provides protection in fights with other hippos and predators. They have very little body hair, and produce a reddish secretion that dries on the skin and protects them from sunburn and water loss.

Photo: Hippo by Thomas Hawk

Endemic to Central America, the Honduran white bat is a small bat (37 - 47 mm in length) with white fur and yellow ears and nose. Using the leaves of the Heliconia plant, these bats make tents to protect them from the elements and predators. They roost under the tents in groups of up to a dozen individuals, taking flight when the stem of the plant is disturbed.
Photo: Honduran white fruit bat by EricksonSmith

Endemic to Central America, the Honduran white bat is a small bat (37 - 47 mm in length) with white fur and yellow ears and nose. Using the leaves of the Heliconia plant, these bats make tents to protect them from the elements and predators. They roost under the tents in groups of up to a dozen individuals, taking flight when the stem of the plant is disturbed.

Photo: Honduran white fruit bat by EricksonSmith

Peafowl can exhibit several kinds of color mutations, including leucism. Unlike albinos, leucistic animals lack most of the color pigments of their non-leucistic counterparts. In the peafowl, this means white feathers but blue eyes. Such mutations are rare in the wild but can be produced using selective breeding.
Photo: Peacocks by icmcwaffle

Peafowl can exhibit several kinds of color mutations, including leucism. Unlike albinos, leucistic animals lack most of the color pigments of their non-leucistic counterparts. In the peafowl, this means white feathers but blue eyes. Such mutations are rare in the wild but can be produced using selective breeding.

Photo: Peacocks by icmcwaffle


The drill is a species of monkey found in West Africa. Drills are closely related to mandrills, and less so to baboons. They have red coloring on their chins and red and blue coloring on their rumps and genitals. 
The number of drills in the wild has greatly declined due to hunting and habitat destruction in their relatively small native area, and they are considered endangered.
Photos (top to bottom) by Andrew Warren, Valerie

The drill is a species of monkey found in West Africa. Drills are closely related to mandrills, and less so to baboons. They have red coloring on their chins and red and blue coloring on their rumps and genitals.

The number of drills in the wild has greatly declined due to hunting and habitat destruction in their relatively small native area, and they are considered endangered.

Photos (top to bottom) by Andrew Warren, Valerie