The dugong is a large, herbivorous mammal found in coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific. The main component of the dugong’s diet is sea grass, which it uproots, shakes clean of sand, and eats whole, including the roots.
Photo: Dugong in sea grass meadow, Marsa Abu Dabbab by Ruth Hartnup

The dugong is a large, herbivorous mammal found in coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific. The main component of the dugong’s diet is sea grass, which it uproots, shakes clean of sand, and eats whole, including the roots.

Photo: Dugong in sea grass meadow, Marsa Abu Dabbab by Ruth Hartnup

Wilson’s bird-of-paradise is endemic to Indonesia. Males are vividly colored and have curled tail feathers. The species is considered near-threatened by IUCN.
Photo: Wilson’s Bird of Paradise by Doug Janson

Wilson’s bird-of-paradise is endemic to Indonesia. Males are vividly colored and have curled tail feathers. The species is considered near-threatened by IUCN.

Photo: Wilson’s Bird of Paradise by Doug Janson

The Greenland shark is a large, slow-moving shark found in the North Atlantic Ocean. Based on a study of a shark’s growth rate, it is hypothesized that Greenland sharks could live to be over 200 years old. This would make them one of the longest-living vertebrates on Earth.
Photo: expl9984 by NOAA Photo Library

The Greenland shark is a large, slow-moving shark found in the North Atlantic Ocean. Based on a study of a shark’s growth rate, it is hypothesized that Greenland sharks could live to be over 200 years old. This would make them one of the longest-living vertebrates on Earth.

Photo: expl9984 by NOAA Photo Library

Native to the western United States and Mexico, the ringtail is a close relative of the raccoon. Ringtails are both nocturnal and very shy, so they are much less commonly observed than raccoons.
Photo: Ringtail (Bassaricus astutas) in Northern CA (2) by Tatiana Gettelman

Native to the western United States and Mexico, the ringtail is a close relative of the raccoon. Ringtails are both nocturnal and very shy, so they are much less commonly observed than raccoons.

Photo: Ringtail (Bassaricus astutas) in Northern CA (2) by Tatiana Gettelman


The striped pyjama squid is found in shallow waters of the coast of Australia. When threatened, it changes colors and produces a slime that may be poisonous.
Photo: Pajama Squid by Klaus Stiefel

The striped pyjama squid is found in shallow waters of the coast of Australia. When threatened, it changes colors and produces a slime that may be poisonous.

Photo: Pajama Squid by Klaus Stiefel

Native to the Kodiak Archipelago of Alaska, Kodiak bears are a subspecies of brown bears that has been isolated for thousands of years. Standing up to 10 feet (3 m) when on their hind legs and weighing up to 1,500 lbs (680 kg), they are the largest of the brown bears and are similar in size to polar bears.
Photo: Kodiak brown bear by Michelle Bender

Native to the Kodiak Archipelago of Alaska, Kodiak bears are a subspecies of brown bears that has been isolated for thousands of years. Standing up to 10 feet (3 m) when on their hind legs and weighing up to 1,500 lbs (680 kg), they are the largest of the brown bears and are similar in size to polar bears.

Photo: Kodiak brown bear by Michelle Bender

Kookaburras are tree kingfishers found in Australia and New Guinea. The calls of the kookaburra sound like human laughter and inspired many legends before the famous children’s song. Some Aboriginal tribes believed kookaburras to be laughing at others’ misfortunes, while others saw their early-morning calls as a signal to wake the other animals.
Photo: Kookaburra by macinate

Kookaburras are tree kingfishers found in Australia and New Guinea. The calls of the kookaburra sound like human laughter and inspired many legends before the famous children’s song. Some Aboriginal tribes believed kookaburras to be laughing at others’ misfortunes, while others saw their early-morning calls as a signal to wake the other animals.

Photo: Kookaburra by macinate

bookrat:

lemurphant:

Peafowl can exhibit several kinds of color mutations, including leucism. Unlike albinos, leucistic animals lack most of the color pigments of their non-leucistic counterparts. In the peafowl, this means white feathers but blue eyes. Such mutations are rare in the wild but can be produced using selective breeding.
Photo: Peacocks by icmcwaffle

Close, but no. If this one has blue eyes than he’s a properly albino peacock.
Albino animals may have blue OR red eyes, it almost totally depends on the species. In cats and humans a lack of pigment in the eyes virtually always causes blue eyes due to the way they refract light. Red eyes are caused by you seeing the underlying red tissue and blood under the eye. If circumstances and the ambient light are just perfect you can even get colorless or purple eyes.
The confusion probably stems from the fact that the most common leucistic animal that the general public is familiar with is a white tiger, which as a cat obviously has the blue eyes rather than red like a mouse, fish, or snake.
Leucism in peacocks usually refers to the pied mutation(although there are other forms of partial albinism selectively bred into them too!). If this peacock has black eyes than it is technically leucistic after all, but that’s still a sub-type of albinism.

Thanks for the explanation. I am not a biologist/zoologist by any means and I appreciate any corrections!
Can you (or anyone) explain the last sentence (how leucism is a sub-type of albinism)?  My understanding is that they are separate conditions with different causes.

bookrat:

lemurphant:

Peafowl can exhibit several kinds of color mutations, including leucism. Unlike albinos, leucistic animals lack most of the color pigments of their non-leucistic counterparts. In the peafowl, this means white feathers but blue eyes. Such mutations are rare in the wild but can be produced using selective breeding.

Photo: Peacocks by icmcwaffle

Close, but no. If this one has blue eyes than he’s a properly albino peacock.

Albino animals may have blue OR red eyes, it almost totally depends on the species. In cats and humans a lack of pigment in the eyes virtually always causes blue eyes due to the way they refract light. Red eyes are caused by you seeing the underlying red tissue and blood under the eye. If circumstances and the ambient light are just perfect you can even get colorless or purple eyes.

The confusion probably stems from the fact that the most common leucistic animal that the general public is familiar with is a white tiger, which as a cat obviously has the blue eyes rather than red like a mouse, fish, or snake.

Leucism in peacocks usually refers to the pied mutation(although there are other forms of partial albinism selectively bred into them too!). If this peacock has black eyes than it is technically leucistic after all, but that’s still a sub-type of albinism.

Thanks for the explanation. I am not a biologist/zoologist by any means and I appreciate any corrections!

Can you (or anyone) explain the last sentence (how leucism is a sub-type of albinism)?  My understanding is that they are separate conditions with different causes.

Reaching lengths of up to 40 feet (12 m), the basking shark is one of the largest species of fish. Like whale sharks and megamouth sharks, basking sharks are filter feeders and survive mostly on plankton. While they can be found feeding close to the surface, they are not aggressive and are harmless to humans.
Photo: the lady and the shark by candiche

Reaching lengths of up to 40 feet (12 m), the basking shark is one of the largest species of fish. Like whale sharks and megamouth sharks, basking sharks are filter feeders and survive mostly on plankton. While they can be found feeding close to the surface, they are not aggressive and are harmless to humans.

Photo: the lady and the shark by candiche

astronomy-to-zoology:

Red-ruffed Lemur (Varecia rubra)

…an endangered species of lemur (Lemuridae) which, like all lemurs, is native to the island of Madagascar, where it is restricted to the rainforests of Masoala Peninsula. Red-ruffed lemurs usually live in small groups (sometimes larger groups are seen) which are lead by females. Like other lemurs, red-ruffed lemurs are mainly frugivores (fruit eaters) and typically seen foraging high in the canopies of trees. 

Currently red-ruffed lemurs are listed as endangered as they face threats from habitat loss due to their need for tall primary forests. Hunting remains a threat to their survival as well. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Primates-Lemuridae-Varecia-V. rubra

Images: Hans Hillewaert and RadioFan